Creating MVP for Early Stage Startups

Ever wonder how to conduct an effective mvp experiments for your idea/startup?
Many startup founders faces difficulty to approach a bigger user group to validate their idea or product. Here, I'm sharing few tricks that I had used to conduct the successful mvp (minimal viable prototype) experiments.

Conducting mvp experiments for b2b/b2b2c products:
  • Discover a potential client, pitch your idea to him and asked for a trial. If they didn't agree ask them reason (that will give you a deeper insight about industry and problem statement) otherwise congratulations you got a client with successful mvp experiment.
  • If your client is a senior executive level person then you can conduct mvp via sending email or pitch deck followed by a video or phone call. These are very busy guys so don't expect much time from them. Your content should be precise and clearly state promised value preposition. Best ways if you can meet them personally somehow.
Conducting mvp experiments for b2c products & services:
  • Depend upon your target audience demography you can go to a Coffee cafe, Night club, College/School, Gym, Sports club, Cafeteria of an IT park and startup conferences to give a early trial of your dummy product, video brochure or survey. There are lots of way to create an mvp for such audience. Higher creative idea give you an easier execution.
  • Sending mass email would be an option but the success rate is 2% only. So to drive higher success rate, first send email to your known contact and then ask them to pass on their direct connections.
Always remember, your knowledge about consumer and industry is the first product of your startup. So if you can sell that knowledge then you could sell the product as well.

P.S. : The content of this article has been posted by me on CoFoundersLab on July 13, 2019. I'm posting it again here so that everyone can access it without any restrictions.

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